Power BI for Office 365

Power BI for Office 365 is now available. It is pretty cool check it out at www.powerbi.com. Power BI allows you too

  • Quickly create collaborative BI sites – enable anyone to quickly create a collaborative BI site to share workbooks containing data and insights.
  • Keep reports up to date with scheduled data refresh – reports that have been saved to the cloud can now connect back to on-premises data sources to refresh the data and stay up to date.
  • Manage data queries for the team – share not only workbooks but also the data queries created in Power Query for Excel. Team members can now build and manage data queries for others to use when creating their own reports.
  • Maintain a Data Catalog of searchable data – IT departments can now use the Data Catalog feature to make it easier for everyone to find and connect to corporate data by searching for it from within Excel.
  • Ask questions of your data in natural language – with the Q&A features people can type questions they have of the data in natural language and the system will interpret the question and present answers in the form of interactive visualizations.
  • Stay connected with mobile access to your reports – stay connected from anywhere with new HTML5 support and the Power BI windows app.

Learn More at: Microsoft Blog Post or Power BI Team Blog.

Book Review: David and Goliath

Author: Malcolm Gladwell

Rating: ★★★☆☆

I did not enjoy David and Goliath as much as Malcolm’s previous books. The gist of the book is many time we think about something as a negative/disadvantage but actually it is not. Underdogs succeed because they have advantages which we fail to see.  Examples in the book were covering varied topics and sometimes did not feel like had a good theme/rhythm. If you like Malcolm’s other books you will enjoy this one too but it is not as good as Outliers or Tipping Point. Smile

Bertha’s nemesis: 119-foot steel pipe

Finally we figured out what was blocking Bertha. SmileSmile 

Highway 99 contractors revealed Friday what’s been blocking Bertha, the giant tunnel machine: The obstruction is steel pipe, left buried by a state groundwater study in 2002.

By Mike Lindblom

Seattle Times transportation reporter

A fragment of steel pipe pokes between spokes of Bertha's cutting face, in this photo from Thursday's inspection. It's part of a 119-foot deep well, left in the soil after a 2002 groundwater test. <br/>

A fragment of steel pipe pokes between spokes of Bertha’s cutting face, in this photo from Thursday’s inspection. It’s part of a 119-foot deep well, left in the soil after a 2002 groundwater test.

Chris Dixon, Seattle Tunnel Partners project manager, left, and Matt Preedy, deputy Highway 99 administrator for the state Department of Transportation, explain what is blocking Bertha.

 

State officials revealed Friday that the mystery object blocking tunnel machine Bertha is a long steel pipe, left buried in 2002 by one of the Highway 99 project’s own research crews.

The tunnel drill has been stranded for a month near Pioneer Square, with no clear strategy yet to extract the pipe.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) could not estimate how much time and money it will take to get the world’s largest drill moving again.

Bertha’s cutting teeth struck the pipe Dec. 3, yet the DOT and its contractors avoided mentioning the steel as a possible culprit for four weeks, despite an incident in which the machine knocked a 55-foot pipe fragment to the surface.

What the ongoing delay means for taxpayers is unclear, but it’s certainly not good.

The costs will be determined later through negotiations between the state and Seattle Tunnel Partners (STP), maybe even a legal dispute.

The $2 billion tunnel budget includes a $40 million risk allowance for repairs and inspections near the front of the rotary cutting face — plus a $105 million general contingency fund to deal with crises. Matt Preedy, deputy Highway 99 administrator for the state Department of Transportation, said some of that money will be consumed.

The culprit is an 8-inch diameter, 119-foot-long well casing, used to measure groundwater for the Alaskan Way Viaduct replacement project, officials said. Back then, a shallow cut-and-cover tunnel was a leading option.

Bertha’s nemesis: 119-foot steel pipe | Local News | The Seattle Times

2014: New Year Resolutions

2013 was amazing year especially one of the most satisfying year from career perspective. Shipping Xbox One was one of the most exciting thing I have done in my life. There was surely side effect of shipping, Smile gained lot of pounds. So now there are 3 things to do…

  1. Get weight under 190 – Diet, exercise(12K steps a day, 3 days in gym, 6+ half/full marathons)
  2. Spend more time with family – At least 3 vacations and more activities together.
  3. Read More – Time to start reading again (book a quarter, more technical stuff with regular blogs posts)

Most importantly keep debt to $0 and save more.